Category Archives: Halifax

Halifax Library

The Amazing Halifax Central Library

 

 

It was my first time to visit the new Halifax Central Library. The space is spectacular with the central staircases creating angles and patterns of light and shadow and giving the overall effect of expansiveness and encouraging exploration.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The 5 storeys are easily accessible via the elevators. I decided to start at the top and work my way down. The top floor has a green area roof garden with views of Halifax. The Pavia Gallery Espresso Bar and Café rooftop patio with outdoor and indoor tables make a great place for a snack or cup of coffee. Comfortable lounge chairs for reading with a view and the adult fiction section complete this floor.

Every floor has an information desk with helpful staff. Computers and study areas, a changing use of space on each of the floors make the space inviting and interesting.

On the fourth floor you find the local history room, African History and culture, and Adult non-fiction. Quiet reading and study areas and meeting rooms of various sizes that can be reserved are found throughout the library.

The third floor is the home of the First Nations Circle. Adult magazines, multilingual materials, a Literacy Collection are found on this floor.

The second floor includes the children’s and teens and preschool areas. A media studio and creative lab and many computers are throughout the area.

The first floor entrance way has the Pavia Gallery Espresso Bar on the right with a selection of food and drink. To the left is a large comfortable reading area with magazines and selected collections for easy browsing. The art installation of 5000 paintings on the size of the traditional library card is amazing. These are all by the artist Cliff Eyland.  The Paul O’Reagan Hall (seating 307) hosts events and performances.

The Halifax Central Library is well worth a visit and if you live in the area a great community hub. It is wonderful to see such a community space in the heart of downtown Halifax and is not your traditional idea of a library.

More Information

 

Artport Gallery Co-op Halifax Airport

 

Artport Gallery Co-op
Stanfield International Airport, Halifax

Artport Gallery artistsThe gallery houses original works by ten local Nova Scotia artists: Peigi Alcorn, Annabelle Caissie, Judy MacIntosh, Warren Melanson, Heather Bowman, Marshall Burgess, Anne Duggan, JoAnne Muise, Pat Stewart, Janet Jones

One of the artists is on site during the open hours.  Drop in and chat and find out more about the artists and their works.

It is a delight to see a local artist cooperative at the airport.   Not only is it fun to browse but also a great place to buy from local artists for gifts or for yourself. Be sure to ask for the artist card to get more information.

Artport Gallery Co-opartport gallery-3481 Artport Gallery Halifax AirportYou will find a wide range of styles and mediums including watercolors, acrylics, oils originals and reproductions in various sizes and formats including matted prints, cards and bookmarks.

This is a great addition to the airport and its support of the arts.

Contact information

Open daily 8:30 am – 8:00 pm
During hours: 902-873-4446
After hours contact Marshall Burgess 902-429-9073

 

 

Community Theatre Is Alive and Well

Last Sunday (April 17, 2011)  I saw the Sunday matinee at the Pond Playhouse in Halifax of “An Enemy of the People” – by Henrik Ibsen. Adapted by Arthur Miller. Although the play was written in 1882 the plot is contemporary today involved with issues of science, the environment, the role of the press and politicians and how greed and corruption and self interest wage war with truth that may be uncomfortable or inconvenient.

The excellent cast, staging and production were very professional and engaging in every aspect. Directed by Gisela O’Brien and produced by Bill VanGorder.

This YouTube video gives an insight into the characters and plot and the quality of the production.

 

The play runs to April 30 2011.  Check below for links to dates and tickets.

Theatre Arts Guild TAG

Theatre Arts Guild TAG

Having seen the play I was interested to find out that The Theatre Arts Guild (TAG) in Halifax, was established 1931 and is celebrating 80 years of continuous Community Theatre. It is Canada’s oldest continually operating community theatre.

 

TAG, is a great example of community theatre in Nova Scotia.   It is a completely volunteer run organization and has 300+ members who manage and participate in adding this rich component to the cultural life.

The Pond Playhouse which hosts TAG has undergone building developments

Pond Playhouse TAG

Pond Playhouse TAG

and changes – all through the efforts of its volunteers.   Each year some new aspect is taken on as a project.  For example:

  • The new upstairs rehearsal hall above the foyer allows for rehearsing a 2nd play while one is in production.  It gives space for some changing and costume storage during a play.
  • The new technical and sound room is upgraded with state of the art computerized sound and lighting management
  • The new Foyer and reception area gives cast and audience a place to mingle and chat after performances.   The mosaic plaque thanks the many sponsors who have supported TAG financially
  • The playhouse now seats 95 in comfortable raised seats having an excellent view and hearing from any spot in the house.
TAG

TAG

Location:   Pond Playhouse, 6 Parkhill Road, Halifax, NS.

TAG ticket prices $16 Non members. $13 members / Seniors / Students. Available at Atlantic Superstore or by phone 902-451-1221 or online at www.ticketsatlantic.com

Upcoming at TAG 2011 Spring season

  • Laundry and Bourbon / Lone Star
  • 80 Years of Musicals

Community Theatre – Halifax area

  • Dartmouth Players
  • Theatre Arts Guild
  • Bedford Players
  • Quick as a Wink Theatre Society

Theatre Nova Scotia

Theatre Nova Scotia promotes the interest of theatre province wide  www.theatrens.ca

Whether you are living in Nova Scotia or traveling – check out the calendar and locations to find plays that you will enjoy.  If you are living near a community theatre – consider getting involved. This could be acting on stage, helping out with props and sets, fundraising or the many other areas.  Great way to get involved in the community and have fun.

Enjoy a Day at the Halifax Waterfront

Halifax Waterfront

You can easily spend a day – or if you have just a few hours you can make a shorter version of this inexpensive way to enjoy the Halifax harbour and its many attractions.  It has something for everyone young or old.

Along the Halifax Boardwalk

Along the Halifax Boardwalk

The Boardwalk on the Halifax side of the harbour stretches from Pier 21 on the South end to the Casino on the North end.  As you walk along you will enjoy the view of the boats and ships on this largest xx …    Many visitors to Halifax arrive via cruise ships and to boardwalk is a great way to experience the historical side of Halifax, enjoy the harbour views and have many places to drop in and shop or enjoy a meal. Be sure to wear good walking shoes and dress in layers even on a sunny day.

The Farmer’s Market near Pier 21 is open daily and has a huge selection of produce but also arts and crafts, baked goods and much more.  Great place to browse or buy.

There is a large Tourist Information Centre with lots of brochures, maps and

Halifax Waterfront

friendly people to advise on where to go and what to see throughout Nova Scotia.  It’s a great place to help in planning your visit.

If you are interested in history, Pier 21 is the Museum of Immigration.  So many people entered Canada through Pier 21 and the exhibits are interesting to give us a view of our history.  The Maritime Museum includes both small and large craft, boat building, sailing, the Titanic explosion in Halifax.

There is plenty of shopping and browsing along the route if you are so inclined.  Nova Scotia crafts, salt water taffy, t-shirts and souvenirs.

The restaurants and snack places are dotted along the route with upscale dining, and family style restaurants as well as take outs if you wish to enjoy your lunch out of doors along the boardwalk.   The small parks along the way have seating or you can perch on the wooden

Ferry Trip

One of my favourite things to do is to take the ferry from Halifax to Dartmouth.  This is the poor man’s harbour cruise.  For $ 1.50 (senior) or $ 2.50 (adult) you can buy a ticket that takes you from the Halifax Ferry terminal to Alderney Landing in Dartmouth. Sit up on

Halifax McDonald Bridge at night from the ferry

Halifax McDonald Bridge at night from the ferry - Time lapse photo

the upper deck and enjoy the activities in the harbour, see the two bridges spanning and joining these two cities.   The ferry system is part of the Halifax Metro transport system.  So you can even use your ticket to get on a bus on the other side.  Or you can enjoy walking around the Alderney Landing area, have a snack or browse and then hop back on the ferry within a 2 hour limit and use the same ticket!

Nighttime also gives a spectacular view of the skyline of Halifax and the bridges.  Best on a clear night and be sure to wrap up warmly.

Dartmouth Waterfront

The Dartmouth side of the harbour gives you a great view of the Halifax skyline.  On the weekend you can visit the Farmers Market.  The Alderney Landing Library is just a few steps away and you can drop in to relax and read a magazine or look at the views of the waterfront from the upper floors.

Alderney Landing Dartmouth

Alderney Landing Dartmouth

If you are in the mood for more walking take a right from the Alderney Landing along the waterfront and follow the path.  This leads over a small bridge which is the beginning of the Shubenacadie Canal.  There are several museums and heritage sites in the vicinity well worth visiting including Evergreen House – the Dartmouth Heritage Museum.  They have “high tea” several afternoons a week.  Check their website for timings.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Map

Click on the map to get bus transit details and to zoom in on the route.  The route shown uses Lower Water street – but just head towards the water to get on the boardwalk at any point.


View Larger Map

==

Useful Links

 

Winter Stroll in Point Pleasant Park

It was a January cold, frosty, icy day in Halifax but the sun was shining brightly. Bundled up for the cold I headed for Point Pleasant Park to see what the park looked like in the winter time.

Families walking in Point Pleasant Park

Families walking in Point Pleasant Park

This is a great family park and lots of people were out enjoying a walk with their dogs.  There are both on and off leash areas.  According to Andre’ Chiasson “It’s a great place to take Ceilidh (our dog) – she can run off leash and be safe. We like to see the dogs there – people are very friendly and the dogs are friendlier off leash. We used to go every week even though it takes us a half hour each way to get there. Ceilidh loves it – when we drive down she starts to get excited when we’re on Connaught Avenue and the closer we get, the more excited she gets. She can’t wait.”

The park has miles of roads and trails. There are many paths where you can go off on your own and explore.  Some of the paths were very icy – more like a skate than a walk.  But most of the trails were cleared and OK for walking.   The occasional maps will show where you are and three sides of the park are on the water with views of Dartmouth, McNab’s Island, the docks,  Purcells Cove, and on summer days you will see sailboats from the different sailing clubs.

In 2003 there was a violent hurricane – Juan that destroyed many of the old

Sculptured Trees

Sculptured Trees Point Pleasant Park

trees in the park.  Some of these are still standing and their beauty is in the sculptured look of their shape.  It is great to see the park is coming back to life.

There are old fortifications to explore and plenty of areas to view the ocean and get down on rocky beaches to watch the waves and the sea gulls.  On this day there were waves rolling in with a view of McNab’s island out towards the mouth of the harbour.   You can enjoy getting down to the water on the rocky beaches – lots of colors in the stones and sea weeds, and the smell of the salt sea air and sound of the sea gulls and waves are peaceful and refreshing.

Point Pleasant Park is situated at the south end of the peninsula of Halifax, near the CPR, tourist ship docking and the South End of Halifax with its stately homes.  You can catch a bus, drive or a 20 minute walk from downtown Halifax.   Be sure to bring your own water and snacks as there is nothing open during the winter.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Whether you live in or near Halifax or are visiting by car or coming in on a tourist ship take some time to enjoy the peaceful trails and explore a historic and natural part of the city.  Every season will have its own special views and things to enjoy.
View Larger Map

Find more hiking places in and around Halifax see these books: